Dossier

Christian Hughes, Assoc. AIA

This intern architect understands the importance of giving back.

Name: Christian James Hughes, Assoc. AIA Firm: Michael Baker International, LLC.; Carnegie Mellon University, Architecture Explorations; Affiliate, The Kingsley Association (Larimer); Affiliate, Green Building Alliance – The Green and Healthy Schools Academy Family: Single, oldest of 4. From Detroit, which is where my immediate family lives. My extended family is divided between North Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, Maryland, Tennessee, and Oklahoma. Years in practice: 3 (including scattered summer internships) Education: Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia – Master of Architecture, May 2014; Carnegie Mellon University, UDream Fellow (Urban Design Regional Employment Action for Minorities) – June – September, 2014 Your first job: Family Dollar Stores What’s the best part of your job? Learning. Learning the tricks of the trade at Michael Baker International....

Read More
Review

Message of Hope, pt. 2

Maggie's Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care

By Raymond Bowman, Assoc. AIA Posted on November 18, 2014

In 1988, Maggie Keswick Jencks was diagnosed with breast cancer. For four years she battled, seemingly successfully, but in 1993 the cancer roared back. She was given two months to live. Crushed, she returned home, despondent. And that’s how she may have lived her last two hopeless months. But with her husband Charles Jencks, she assembled a “pile of hope” from popular news at the time. Every day details came out about some new treatment or another. People all over were cheating their own two month death sentences, through treatment, diet, exercise. Empowered by this information, she took charge of her treatment and sought advanced chemotherapy. She also connected with fellow cancer patients for support and community. She lived two full...

Read More
Feature

Message of Hope, pt. 1

A personal look at Maggie's Centres with Charles Jencks

By Vincent DeFazio, Assoc. AIA Posted on November 12, 2014

Charles Jencks stands at the podium, tall and lanky but defiantly confident. A well-packed Carnegie Music Hall applauds the world-renowned landscape architect and architectural theorist as he pipes out a few initial thoughts to calm the diverse crowd. After a brief description of a 16th century painting on the screen above his head depicting hope on the horizons, Jencks jumps straight into what has propelled him into the international spotlight; Maggie’s Centres. Before even giving an overall synopsis of what his famed centers are, Jencks makes sure to tell the audience what inspired them: hope. He explains that hope is an architect’s best tool when creating any built environment; buildings are trajectories into the future – a horizon and a...

Read More
Feature

Design Pittsburgh 2014

See the winners of our juried competition

By AIA Pittsburgh Posted on October 23, 2014

ARCHITECTURE: Honor Award
 PROJECT: Graduate School of Public Health 
CLIENT: University of Pittsburgh ARCHITECTURE FIRM: Joint Venture: Renaissance 3 Architects, P.C. and Wilson Architects CONTRACTOR: PJ Dick 
ENGINEERS: Affiliated Engineers Metro DC, Inc.; Barber & Hoffman, Inc.; The Gateway Engineers, Inc. PHOTOGRAPHER: Anton Grassl of Esto Photographics DESCRIPTION: The Graduate School of Public Health is located on a main thoroughfare that runs the length of the University of Pittsburgh’s urban campus. The University sought a building that would establish a real presence for GSPH in the community and reflect the significant research occurring within. By designing an elevated addition with extensive glass facades, the building showcases the school’s activities along the main avenue; the transparent facades eliminate barriers between the...

Read More
Dossier

Adam Yarinsky, FAIA LEED AP

Meet one of the jurors for #DesignPgh14

Name: Adam Yarinsky, FAIA LEED AP Firm: Architecture Research Office (ARO) Family: Wife and two children, ages 13 and 17 Years in practice: 27 (21 with ARO) Education: BS in Architecture, University of Virginia; M. Arch, Princeton University Your first job: Raking leaves. Project you’re proudest of: Most recently, the boat house we designed on the Hudson River in Beacon, New York. Having grown up in the Hudson Valley, it was especially satisfying to help connect people to the river, which is a national treasure. What’s the best part of your job? I am always learning; almost every day presents new challenges and opportunities. What’s the most annoying thing architects do? Behave with hubris, rather than humility. What’s the next...

Read More
Feature

For the Love of Pittsburgh

Mayor Peduto on our City in Transition

By Becky Spevack Posted on September 9, 2014

“I love cities, let’s just put it that way.” So proclaims Pittsburgh’s 60th mayor, Bill Peduto. I find myself sitting in his office on a sunny Friday afternoon, alongside Kevin Kunak, Assoc. AIA, to discuss his recent trip to Louisville, Kentucky to partake in the Mayors’ Institute on City Design. The Mayor’s Institute (or MICD) began in 1986, a leadership initiative of the National Endowments for the Arts in partnership with the American Architectural Foundation, seeking to transform communities through design by preparing mayors to be the chief urban designers of their cities. Each session involves 6-8 mayors gathering in a host city with 6-8 design professionals, spending three days presenting design problems or projects to the group and brainstorming...

Read More
Feature

I Want My CRANtv

Residential Expertise Comes to YouTube

By Becky Spevack Posted on August 12, 2014

Last September, the Custom Residential Architects Network, an AIA Knowledge Community, created their own channel on YouTube, CRANtv, and published a short video entitled “The Architect’s Education”. Ten months and four videos later, CRANtv has garnered over 7,000 views and its creators hope to continue to build a library of educational tools to communicate the value of the residential architect. Columns was able to catch up with the AIA National Chair of CRAN David Andreozzi, AIA and learn more about how the series was started. COLUMNS: You are a residential architect in Rhode Island, as well as involved at not only a local but national level with the AIA and the Custom Residential Architects Network. How and why did you...

Read More
Feature

Get Noticed!

5 Great Reasons to Participate in Design Pittsburgh 2014

By Becky Spevack Posted on August 5, 2014

Each autumn, AIA Pittsburgh presents its signature program, Design Pittsburgh – a celebration of architecture and design, honoring those who create it. Haven’t been? Never entered the competition? Or don’t want to take the time? Here are five good reasons why you should… Get your work in front of a wide and varied audience. Last year, AIA Pittsburgh welcomed over 1,000 individuals during the 2013 Design Pittsburgh program, including architects, sponsors, media partners, businesses, community and cultural leaders, and design enthusiasts. Additionally, there were over 2,300 individuals who viewed the Design Award Submissions online and voted for the People’s Choice Award. There’s a different jury every year. Submitted a project last year that didn’t take top prize? Each year you’ll have...

Read More
Dossier

Raymond Bowman, Assoc. AIA

You may have to ask a dumb question. It's ok.

Name: Raymond Bowman, Assoc. AIA Family: Married Years in practice: 6 Education: B.Arch., Carnegie Mellon University I belong to the AIA because: I like the friendships I’ve made and participating in the events I’ve heard about through the organization. Some people call this “networking”. What’s the best part of your job? As a young architect, it’s great to be involved in all phases of a project. What would you change about your job? More time outside. I’d settle for more time not immediately in front of a computer screen. Most embarrassing moment: I tore my pants right before a meeting with a client and, to cover it, wore a woman’s sweater around my waist, making the attempt to hide the...

Read More
Review

Simply Stated

The Laws of Simplicity by John Maeda

By David Julian Roth, AIA, LEED AP BD+C Posted on June 4, 2014

John Maeda is a master of simplicity, a professor in MIT’s Media Lab, and an accomplished graphic designer. His work explores the question of how we can redefine the notion of “improved”. It doesn’t mean that bigger is better but rather that less is (indeed) more. He sees simplicity as equal to our sanity, stating “technology has made our lives more full, yet at the same time we’ve become uncomfortably full.” My own design process is defined by not overthinking a problem and generally offering a simple, “un-designed” solution. This doesn’t mean no design, but simply less. This seems important if we’re constructing 100-year buildings. To stand the test of time, these structures “must first be beautiful”(1) and offer flexible...

Read More